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Health Care Access Survey Results

Table of Contents

Printable/Accessible Version Available here (1.25 Mb)

Introduction: Surveying the barriers to accessing Health Care

While access to quality and timely health care is a leading indicator of population health, many studies have revealed that people with disabilities are more likely to go without needed care. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires that health care services are accessible to people with disabilities and the ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) outline the technical requirements for physical access. Assessing a clinic for all of the technical requirements of the ADAAG requires looking at hundreds of items, and it can be a time consuming process. The RRTC: Health & Wellness is partnering with the Northwest ADA & IT Center in order to create a useful and user-friendly tool called the Outpatient Health Clinic Access Profile (OHCAP). It will be used to evaluate the physical accessibility of outpatient health care clinics and provide information on best practices for access to services. An important element to OHCAP will be the prioritization of areas that are critical for accessibility. For instance, while the ADAAG has requirements about the accessibility of drinking fountains, these requirements may not be as important to people with disabilities as the width of doorways or clearly marked signs.

The first step in developing OHCAP was to get input from people with disabilities on the barriers to accessing health care and what was important to them in accessing health care facilities. To do this the RRTC: Health & Wellness developed a short Internet survey. With the help of our partners at Independent Living Resources Utilization, the survey was distributed nationally though multiple listservs and consumer organizations in the fall of 2005. Initially the survey creators hoped to get at least 100 responses to the survey. After about two weeks, over 950 responses to the survey were received. The overwhelming response to the Health Care Access Survey indicates that the accessibility of health services is clearly an important topic for people in the disability community. It also provides valuable information that will inform the creation of OHCAP.

We have briefly summarized the results in the following document. We would like to thank all the people that took the time to respond to the survey. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us at:

RRTC: Health & Wellness
OHSU - CDRC
PO Box 574
Portland, OR 97207
503-494-3534
rrtc@ohsu.edu

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Question 1: How important are each of the following factors to you in accessing primary health care?

Question 1 Response Summary:

This chart shows the results for the question "How important are each of the following factors to you in accessing primary health care?" There were a total of 961 respondents to this survey, though 8 skipped this question. To the first factor, "Health insurance that provides coverage for the care you need" 95% stated "very important", 4% chose "somewhat important", and 1% chose "not important. For "Location of your Primary Health Care Provider's office in relation to public transportation (bus stop or train stop)" 38% chose "very important", 22% chose "somewhat important", 20% chose "neither important nor unimportant", 4% chose "somewhat unimportant", and 17% chose "not important. Regarding "Primary Health Care Provider's knowledge about your disability" 81% chose "very important", 16% chose "somewhat important", 2% chose "neither important nor unimportant", and 1% chose "not important". Concerning "Attitude of your Primary Health Care Provider" 89% chose "very important", 9% chose "somewhat important", and 1% chose "neither important nor unimportant". For "Attitude of the Primary Clinic Staff" 76% chose "very important", 21% chose "somewhat important", and 2% chose "neither important nor unimportant". Finally, for "auxiliary aids and services such as large print forms or sign language interpreters" 31% chose "very important", 23% chose "somewhat important", 24% chose "neither important nor unimportant", 4% chose "somewhat unimportant", and 17% chose "not important".

Question 1 Response Chart:

Figure 1 - Important Factors in Accessing Health Care

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Question 2: What are the five most important areas for accessibility when you visit your primary health care provider?

Question 2 Response Summary:

A total of 943 respondents provided rankings for areas of accessibility.

Question 2 Response Data:

Participants were asked to rank the most important area with a numeral 1, the second most important area with a numeral 2, and so on through their top five. The following tables show the data gathered from this question.

 

Rank 1

Rank 2

Rank 3

Rank 4

Rank 5

Parking

233

99

49

33

60

Entrances & exits

97

79

57

53

66

Route from my transportation to the entrance of the building (includes curb cuts)

87

87

60

29

48

Ramps

85

63

61

40

28

Exam Rooms
(includes doors and all other physical elements of the room)

83

72

82

86

66

Exam Table

69

49

53

58

46

Other

64

6

8

8

22

Elevators/Platform lifts

59

74

69

65

43

Medical Equipment

(for example, a scale accessible to a person in a wheelchair)

53

33

43

47

96

Restrooms
(includes sink, toilet, doors and other physical elements of the room)

49

60

67

86

77

Passenger Loading Zone
(drop off or pick up area near entrance)

47

47

25

23

34

Diagnostic Equipment

47

37

39

52

48

Diagnostic Rooms
(includes x-ray room, lab or other diagnostic)

43

49

58

48

57

Signage

36

38

33

23

27

Telephones
(for example, amplified phones or TTYs)

30

22

18

14

30

Alarms  (for example, fire alarms with flashing lights)

27

15

25

14

22

Dressing Rooms
(includes door, benches, and all other physical elements of the room)

26

21

21

30

30

Detectable Warnings

(for example, the raised domes on a ramp leading into a crosswalk)

21

10

16

11

19

Stairs

20

13

12

12

34

Lobby

16

19

28

30

38

Drinking Fountains

15

10

12

11

26

Corridors

13

15

14

26

22

Most frequently indicated priorities in each rank

Rank

Priority

Frequency

Percent of Total (943)

1

Parking

233

24.7%

2

Parking

99

10.5%

3

Exam rooms

82

8.7%

4

Tie: Restrooms & Exam rooms

86

9.1%

5

Medical equipment

96

10.2%

 

A total of 943 respondents provided rankings for areas of accessibility when asked �What are the five most important areas for accessibility when you visit your primary health care provider?�  Participants were asked to rank the most important area with a numeral 1, the second most important area with a numeral 2, and so on through their top five.  The following graphs show the data gathered from this question.

Ranking 1

Ranking Graph

This chart shows those areas that respondents chose as the most important (ranking 1) areas for consideration when visiting their primary health care provider. The top five areas chosen as most important were: Parking, 233; Entrances & Exit, 97; Ramps, 85; Examination Rooms, 83; Examination Tables 69.

Ranking 2

Ranking Graph

This chart shows those areas that respondents chose as the second most important (ranking 2) areas for consideration when visiting their primary health care providers and the number of people who chose this area as their second most important area for consideration. The top five areas chosen as most important were: Parking, 99; Entrances & Exit, 79; Route from my Transportation to building, 87; Ramps, 63, and Examination Rooms, 72.

Ranking 3

Ranking Graph

This chart shows those areas that respondents chose as the third most important (ranking 3) areas for consideration when visiting their primary health care provider. The top five areas chosen as the third most important were: Exam Rooms, 82; Elevators/Platform/Lifts, 69; Restrooms, 67; Ramps, 61; and Route from my Transportation to building, 60.

Ranking 4

 Ranking Graph

This chart shows those areas that respondents chose as the fourth most important (ranking 4) areas for consideration when visiting their primary health care provider. The top five areas chosen as most important were: Exam Rooms, 86; Restrooms, 86; Elevators/Platform Lifts, 65; Exam Tables, 58; Entrances & Exit, 53.

Ranking 5

Ranking Graph

This chart shows those areas that respondents chose as the fifth most important (ranking 5) areas for consideration when visiting their primary health care provider. The top five areas chosen as most important were: Medical Equipment, 96; Restrooms, 77; Exam Rooms, 66; Entrances & Exit, 66; Parking, 60

Question 3: In the past 12 months, was there a time when you needed health care but did not get it?

Question 3 Response Summary:

802 of 943 respondents provided an answer to whether they had needed health care, but did not get it. 141 respondents did not answer this question.

Question 3 Response Data:

Ranking Graph

Answer

Frequency

Percent of Total (943)

Yes

324

34.4%

No

470

49.8%

Don't Know

8

0.8%

No Answer

141

15%

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Question 4: If you answered "yes" to question 3, what were the most important reasons that you did not get the health care you needed in this situation?

Question 4 Response Summary:

324 respondents to the survey chose "yes", at which point they were directed to rank the reasons why they were not able to access health care.

Question 4 Response Data:

 

Rank1

Rank2

Rank3

I could not get an appointment

51

24

19

I didn't know a good health care provider or clinic to go to for treatment

22

11

18

I couldn't find a health care provider who speaks my language

7

2

7

The primary health care providers hours were not convenient

18

16

11

I did not have childcare

5

2

6

I had no transportation, or the health care provider's office was too far

31

20

13

It cost too much

56

32

14

I was too afraid or nervous

8

10

13

I didn't want to go

5

11

14

My health problem went away

6

6

10

My health care was not covered by insurance

38

38

23

It was too difficult to get to the health care provider's office

15

26

17

I had difficulty or a disagreement with my health care provider

11

14

19

I couldn�t find a health care provider who understands or was willing to treat my disability.

32

30

34

I couldn�t find a health care provider who was willing to provide a sign language interpreter.

11

5

7

The wait in the health care provider's office was too long

8

10

20

The paperwork was too great

5

5

8

I don't know

2

1

6

Other

57

14

27

Most Frequently indicated reasons in each rank

Rank

Reasons

Frequency

Percent of Total (324)

1

Other

57

17.6%

2

Not covered by insurance

38

4.0%

3

Couldn't find provider to treat disability

34

3.6%

Rank 1

Results Graph

 

Of 324 respondents, the top three primary reasons they did not receive medical treatment were as follows: 57 listed �Other�; 56 listed �It Cost too Much�; 51 listed �I could not get an appointment.�


Rank 2

Results Graph


Of 324 respondents, the top three secondary reasons they did not receive medical treatment were as follows: 38 listed �My care was not covered by insurance;� 32 listed �It Cost too Much�; and 30 listed �I couldn�t find anyone to treat my disability.�

Rank 3


 Results Graph

Of 324 respondents, the top three third ranking reasons they did not receive medical treatment were as follows: 34 listed �I couldn�t find anyone to treat my disability;� 27 listed �Other;� and 23 listed �My care was not covered by insurance.�

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Question 5: Which of the following categories are affected by your disability?

 

Question 5 Response Summary:

Of 961 respondants, 33.6% stated that their mobility was affected by disability; 33.4% claimed more than one area affected; 16.2% gave no response; 6.8% responded that their hearing was affected; 4.4% stated "other"; 3.1% claimed that their vision was affected; 2.5% stated that their cognitive functioning was affected.

Questions 5 Response Chart:

Type of Disability Graph

Of 961 respondents, 33.6% stated that their mobility was affected by disability; 33.4% claimed more than one area affected; 16.2% gave no response; 6.8% responded that their hearing was affected; 4.4% stated "other"; 3.1% claimed that their vision was affected; 2.5% stated that their cognitive functioning was affected.

 

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Question 6: What is your gender?

 

Question 6 Response Summary:

Of a total of 961 respondants, 57.5% were female, 27.4% were male, and 15.1% gave no response to the question regarding gender. The mean age of respondants was 45 years old.

Questions 6 Response Chart:

Gender Graph

Of a total of 961 respondents, 57.5% were female, 27.4% were male, and 15.1% gave no response to the question regarding gender.  The mean age of respondents was 45 years old.

 

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Question 7: What is your ethnicity? (check only one)

Question 7 Response Summary:

Of 961 respondants, 78.7% were not Hispanic or Latino/a, 16.6% gave no response, 3.1% were Hispanic or Latino/a, and 1.6 responded that they don't know their ethnicity.

Question 7 Response Chart:

Ethnicity Graph

Of 961 respondents, 78.7% were not Hispanic or Latino/a, 16.6% gave no response, 3.1% were Hispanic or Latino/a, and 1.6 responded that they don't know their ethnicity.

 

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Question 8: What is your race? (check all that apply)

Question 8 Response Summary:

Of 961 respondants, 76.1% were White, 15.3% gave no response, 3.1% were "other", 2.8% were Black or African American, 1.2% were Native American or Alaskan Native, 0.7% were Asian, 0.6% responded that they didn't know, 0.1% were Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander.

Question 8 Response Chart:

Race Graph

Of 961 respondents, 76.1% were White, 15.3% gave no response, 3.1% were "other", 2.8% were Black or African American, 1.2% were Native American or Alaskan Native, 0.7% were Asian, 0.6% responded that they didn't know, 0.1% were Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander.

 

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Question 9: How would you describe the community where you live?

Question 9 Response Summary:

Of 961 respondants, 54.9% lived in an urban community, 26.7% lived in a rural community, 15.1% gave no response, and 3.2% stated that they didn't know what type of community they lived in.

Question 9 Response Chart:

Community Graph

Of 961 Respondents, 54.9% lived in an urban community, 26.7% lived in a rural community, 15.1% gave no response, and 3.2% stated they didn�t know what type of community they lived in.

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